Greenbrier High School

Too Sick for School?

Columbia County School District
Student Health Services
Is Your Child Too Sick for School?
In order to assist in preventing the spread of illness, students should not be given fever-reducing
medication in order to return to school. In addition, the following guidelines have been established
regarding the exclusion and readmission to school due to illness:
1. Diarrhea/Watery Stools :
a. Student will be sent home from school for:
i. More than two episodes of diarrhea occurring during a school day.
ii. One episode of diarrhea if other symptoms are present (e.g. fever, abdominal
discomfort, vomiting , etc.)
iii. Soiling themselves or their clothing.
b. Student may return to school 24 hours after the last diarrhea stool if they have no other
symptoms present.
2. Vomiting:
a. Student will be sent home from school for:
i. More than one episode of vomiting occurring during a school day.
ii. One episode of vomiting if other symptoms are present(e.g. Fever, abdominal
discomfort, diarrhea, etc.).
b. Student may return to school 24 hours after the last vomiting episode if they have no other
symptoms present.
3. Fever: (Normal oral temperature is 98.6 degrees F):
a. Low-grade (Oral temperature 99.5 to 99.9):
i. The school nurse will notify the parent/guardian of students with low-grade fever.
ii. Student will low-grade fever may remain in school if no other symptoms are present.
iii. Students will be sent home from school with low-grade fever if other symptoms (e.g.
cough, sore throat, headache, abdominal discomfort, etc.) are present.
iv. Student should NOT be given fever-reducing medication in order to return to school.
b. High-grade (Oral temperature 100 degrees F or above)):
i. Students will be sent home from school for a high-grade fever.
ii. Student may not return to school until free of fever for 24 hours without the use of
fever reducing medications.
iii. Students will not be dismissed to the bus with a high-grade fever.
c. Oral temperature of 104 degrees F or above:
i. The school nurse will institute measures to bring down the child’s temperature:
1. Allow student to lie down on cot.
2. Ask/assist student to remove outer layers of clothing, such as a jacket,
sweater, second shirt, and shoes.
3. Do not place blanket on student.
4. Apply cool washcloth or towel to student's forehead and arm pits (if area is
accessible). Keep cloths cool and damp.
5. Offer sips of cool water only if student is not vomiting and is free of abdominal
pains.
ii. The parent/guardian will be notified immediately.
iii. The school nurse/trained clinic personnel will call 911 if the parent/guardian is unable
to arrive at school within fifteen minutes to pick up their student.
4. Drainage:
a. It is not necessary to exclude every student from school who has drainage from the nose,
eye, ear or open sores.
b. Exclusion from school will be at the discretion of the school nurse, and /or principal or
designee based on the following criteria:
i. Color of discharge
ii. Student’s personal hygiene skills and need for assistance
iii. Classroom setting
iv. Student’s developmental level.
v. If the student is on prescribed antibiotic treatment,oral or topical, he/she are required
to be on treatment for 24 hours prior to returning to school.
5. Strep Throat or Scarlet Fever:
a. These are two highly contagious conditions caused by a bacterial infection.
b. Symptoms usually appear suddenly with a complaint of sore throat, fever and often
stomachache and headache.
c. A rash usually appears within 12-48 hours with Scarlet Fever.
d. A child with these symptoms needs to see a healthcare provider for evaluation and treatment.
e. Required to remain out of school until no fever and has been on antibiotics for 24 hours.
6. Pink Eye or Conjunctivitis:
a. Caused by a virus, bacteria or allergy.
b. Viral and bacterial conjunctivitis are very contagious.
c. Consult your healthcare provider for treatment.
d. The child is required to stay out of school until symptoms subside or they have been on
antibiotic ointment for at least 24 hrs.
7. Impetigo:
a. This infection is a strep or staph infection that creates a red, oozing blister-like rash that can
appear anywhere on the body or face.
b. It can be passed on to others by contact.
c. Consult your healthcare provider for treatment and length of time the child should remain out
of school. However, if antibiotics, oral or topical, are prescribed, the student will not be
allowed to return to school for 24 hours.
8. Chicken Pox:
a. Most school aged children have received the Varicella Vaccine which should prevent them
from getting chickenpox.
b. Chicken pox is a highly contagious viral illness.
c. If your child does get chickenpox, school exclusion is required until all rash is dry and new
rash/bumps have not appeared for two days.
d. Your child is contagious at least two days before the rash starts, so you need to let the school
and playmates know of the diagnosis.
9. Mites or Scabies:
a. Mites are tiny insects that burrow into the skin and cause severe itching.
b. If Scabies is suspected, you should visit your healthcare provider for treatment.
c. Students must remain out of school until treated by prescribed medication from the
healthcare provider.
10. Head Lice:
a. Student may return to school after treatment and no live lice are found.
b. The student will be checked prior to returning to the classroom
c. The students head will be checked for lice 7 to 10 days after live lice are found.
d. Caution your child against sharing combs, brushes, hats or other clothing.
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